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05 January 2019

Published also in Business Mirror

THE Bureau of Customs (BOC) has issued an order that further revises and provides more details to accreditation guidelines for importers and customs brokers.

Customs Memorandum Order (CMO) 28-2018, signed on December 10 by Customs commissioner Rey Leonardo Guerrero, states that all new applications for accreditation filed by importers and customs brokers must now be submitted by the Account Management Office (AMO), duly concurred with by the deputy commissioner for Intelligence Group (IG), to the customs commissioner for approval or disapproval.

These applications pertain to the renewal, reapplication, reinstatement, suspension, revocation or cancellation of accreditation, as well as to the activation of the Client Profile Registration System (CPRS) of entities accredited by other government agencies.

AMO is the office in the BOC tasked to process importers’ accreditation and customs brokers’ registration.

CMO 28-2018 was issued in relation to CMOs 23-2018 and 24-2018. CMO 23-2018, dated November 26, orders AMO to seek OCOM approval on the renewal, registration, reapplication, reinstatement, suspension [with lifting of suspension], and revocation or cancellation of accreditation.

CMO 24-2018 was signed on November 27 and places AMO under the direct control and supervision of the IG deputy commissioner.

Under CMO 28-2018, the AMO chief shall prepare a disposition, with the concurrence of the IG deputy commissioner, on all recommendations to activate accreditation or lift accreditation suspension as well as to activate CPRS/tax identification number, subject to approval of the customs commissioner. The final order on the matter shall be endorsed to the AMO for immediate implementation.

All applications will be processed within seven working days of receipt of application with complete documentary requirements, pursuant to Republic Act 11032, or the Ease of Doing Business and Efficient Government Service Delivery Act of 2018.

CMO 28-2018 repeals or amends any orders, rules or regulations inconsistent with it.

OCOM approval on accreditation matters was also required by other former customs commissioners in a bid to eradicate consignees-for-hire and fly-by-night importers and customs brokers.

Prior to CMO 23-2018, former Customs Commissioner Isidro S. Lapeña issued last January CMO 02-2018, which required approval or disapproval by the customs commissioner—based on the recommendation of the AMO chief—of the application for accreditation of importers and customs brokers. www.portcalls.com

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